Category Archives: Access Issues

“MARC” Cataloguing

In preparing for class this week, I’m brushing up on some readings on the topic of authority control, controlled vocabulary and AACR2.  While reading Michael Gorman’s article Authority Control in the Context of Bibliographic Control in the Electronic Environment (2009), I stumbled upon these wise words:

People who talk of “MARC cataloguing” clearly think of cataloguing as being a matter of identifying the elements of a bibliographic record without specifying the content of those elements.  It is, therefore, clear that those people do not understand what cataloguing is all about. (p. 16)

While there are many of you who may not always agree with Gorman, you must acknowledge that this statement is spot on in its observation.  How many of us, in the practicing profession, have seen the devaluation of cataloguers from a position that requires training in cataloguing to a position that requires no more than a high school diploma?  Cataloguing is not simple data entry, and understanding how to catalogue within a MARC record is not as simple identifying the field and inputting straightforward data and punctuation.  However, in many public libraries with tight budgets, we often turn to library assistants for help in editing our MARC records.  Does this activity make them a cataloguer?  While using staff as a valuable resource, is this also confusing (sending mixed signals) management and other professionals about the knowledge, skills and judgement (Gorman) necessary to be a cataloguer?

Gorman goes on to state “[T]he most important thing about bibliographic control is the content and the controlled nature of that content, not the denotations of that content.” (p. 16)

While Gorman is discussing all of this in the context of his dislike of Dublin Core, his comments should have us all rethinking how we hire, train and educate our future cataloguers and librarians.  It should also have us questioning why such a vital service – the access to information and retrieval of information –  is so misunderstood.

A great discussion can certainly develop from the brief comments I have made, starting with the complexity of MARC and our descriptive standards, however, if our professional can’t clearly communicate the overarching goals and practices of cataloguing, the details about how we set out to achieve these goals will not matter in the long run.

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Filed under Access Issues, Authority Work, In the Cataloguing Department, The Cataloguer

Interesting and Exciting – Free 3-day Library 2.011 Virtual conference Nov. 2-4, 2011

Starting tomorrow, the Library 2.011 Worldwide Virtual Conference will kick-off at 9:30
am EST. Take advantage of this great opportunity to strengthen your knowledge on digital
technologies for a variety of services. Will you be there? (Register here)

Thanks to Stephen Abram, for blogging about this conference.  I thought I’d post it for anyone else who hasn’t seen it.
Registration is Free and so far there are over 5,000 participants, with over 40 registering every hour.

Here’s a reposting of the conference schedule based on Eastern Standard Time:

Wednesday, November 2

9:30am

Conference Welcome

10:00am

OPENING KEYNOTE:  Sandy Hirsh

11:00am

KEYNOTE: Lennart Björneborn

11:00am

Developing and Implementing Findability Standards – Ravi Mynampaty, Search Guy

11:00am

Making State Documents Relevant with Social Media – Abby Swanton, Librarian

11:00am

Training Core Knowledge Skills by Finding Treasure – Melanie Metzger, Assistant Library Director: Children’s Services

11:00am

Virtual Reference and Instruction: What is it really like? – Reina Williams, Online Reference Librarian

11:00am

What’s In A Frame? Metadata and Moving Images – Caitlin Bakker, Digital Content Projects Coordinator

12:00pm

Incorporating Digital Storytelling Into Your Instruction: A Toolkit – Cassy Lee, MLIS student

12:00pm

Leveraging multiple literacies for sticky search education – Tasha Bergson-Michelson, Search Education Curriculum Fellow

12:00pm

Librarians Use of Social Media Profile Photos – Julie Still, Reference Librarian

12:00pm

SPOTLIGHT:  Future Ready – Cindy Romaine, President SLA

12:00pm

Today’s Libraries and the Self-Checkout Technology – Dr. Ruphina Ozoh

1:00pm

Are  librarians going the way of travel agents in the age of Google? –  Prakash L Dheeriya, PhD, Father, Author & Professor of Finance

1:00pm

Glogging In – Creating Multimedia Activities and Assessments – Kristina A. Holzweiss, School Library Media Specialist

1:00pm

New trends in American librarianship – Nowe trendy w amerykanskim bibliotekarstwie – Dr Beata Anna Cessak Obydzinski

1:00pm

Talking about bBooks with kids – Lisa Durff,  Flat Classroom® Coordinator

1:00pm

Understanding the Universe of LIS Career Opportunities – Scott Brown, Owner

1:00pm

Where were you when you looked that up? – The geography of information needs – Andrew Carlos, Electronic Resources Librarians

2:00pm

Don’t  Just Sit There! Tips for Engaging Participants in Online Sessions –  Debbie Faires, Assistant Director for Distance Learning

2:00pm

Happiness as a learning outcome in the digital age – Naresh Kumar Agarwal, Assistant Professor

2:00pm

Multiliteracy is the new Information Literacy – Diane Fulkerson Social Sciences and Education Librarian

2:00pm

Patterns of Participation in a Virtual Collaboratory – Kristen Radsliff Rebmann, Ph.D., MLIS; Assistant Professor

2:00pm

Situating the Academic Library for Digital Natives: Enhancing Student Learning Through DLMs – John D. Shank

2:00pm

The Brave New World of Genre Fiction Selection – Marlene Harris

3:00pm

Blogging – a possible solution for reading – Ms. Nadina C. Nicolici

3:00pm

Building  Visual and Digital Literacy; Framing a Youth Conversion Globally around  Community Identity in a Dynamically Growing Online Visual Library –  Corinne Okada Takara, Arts Educator,  Slot Shelters Project Lead

3:00pm

Smart Objects on the Cheap: DIY Interactive Digital Exhibits – Jeremy William Kemp, Full-time faculty

3:00pm

Towards a Knowledge Economy – Jacquelyn Erdman, Knowledge Exchange Coordinator

3:00pm

Who needs a computer? I have a QR Reader! – Jennifer Shafer, Library Specialist

4:00pm

Gut geplant, fast gewonnen – Eine OPL stellt sich der Social-Media Herausforderung – Dierk Eichel

4:00pm

Read, Watch, or Talk: 3 Methods for Engaging in Library Instruction – Michelle M. Powers, Manager of Library Services

4:00pm

Spotlight  on the Learner: a Third Dimension of Information Literacy – Mary Iber,  Consulting Librarian for the Sciences, Kinesiology and College Archivist

4:00pm

The Future of Emerging Technologies in Libraries – Dr. Sandra Hirsh, Director

4:00pm

Use  of Digital Tools to Create a Learning Commons in the English Language  Arts Classroom – Richard Beach, Professor Emeritus of English Education

5:00pm

Back to the Future – Sarah Baker, Education Librarian

5:00pm

Librarianship + Leadership: understanding challenges in change management – Nicole Forsythe, Digital Services Librarian

5:00pm

Project-Based  Learning in Higher Education: Developing Information Literacy Skills  and Global Competency in Research and Technology Course – Melda Yildiz,  Associate Professor

5:00pm

SPOTLIGHT:   Frontline Fundraising for Libraries – Roberta Stevens, Immediate Past  President, American Library Association and Outreach Projects and  Partnerships Officer

5:00pm

The Impact of Technology on Library Design – Lynn Cunningham,  Associate Curator of Visual Resources

6:00pm

Alternate Careers in Federal Government – Nancy Faget, Federal Librarian

6:00pm

Learning to Lead: Technology Lessons Learned from Pre-Service School Librarians – Daniella Smith, Assistant Professor

6:00pm

Peer  Coaching and Teacher Librarians: Creating a Catalyst for Classroom  Impact – Colet Bartow, Library-Information Literacy Curriculum  Specialist

6:00pm

SPOTLIGHT:   The Role for Professional Library Services in National Development of  Low-income Countries – Jane Kinney Meyers, President

6:00pm

Teaching Plagiarism Prevention in an Online Environment – Breanne Kirsch, Evening Public Services Librarian

7:00pm

How Can You Obtain More Operational Funding and Develop Sustainable Funding for Your Library?  Think Salmon! – janet jai, Author

7:00pm

Impact and Effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian Libraries – Michael Stephens Assistant Professor

7:00pm

Successful Residency Programs in Non-Academic Settings: The evidence so far – Cindy Mediavilla, Planning Project Manager

7:00pm

The Modern Library: A Progressive Hub For Job Seekers? – Tim Tyrell-Smith, Founder and CEO

7:00pm

Virtual Tornado: a Library Exhibit and Simulation – Valerie Hill, Librarian

8:00pm

Book Club 2.0: How to Start and Run a 21st Century Book Club – Ben Curran–teacher/consultant

8:00pm

Creating a School Learning Commons – Professor David V. Loertscher

8:00pm

Putting  the “Information” into “Information Technology” : Reflections on a  Non-Traditional LIS Career – Laura C. Anderson, Manager, Advanced  Estimating & Infrastructure Solutions

8:00pm

State Library of Queensland’s web 2.0 program: the what, why, who and when – Linda Barron, Directorate Support Officer

8:00pm

The Library of the Future Will Include the One You Make Yourself – Kathleen Johnson, Librarian

8:00pm

Wake Up! With Polling, Surveying and Backchanneling – Nikki Robertson

9:00pm

KEYNOTE: Michael Stephens

9:00pm

Engaging  Special Collections Archives while Teaching Digital Storytelling –  Alison Regan, Ph.D.,Associate Librarian, Acting Head, Digital  Scholarship Lab

9:00pm

Live the Literature: Digital Storytelling with Bookcasts – Cris Crissman, PhD

9:00pm

Tiers for Fears: QUT Library’s learning and Study support service – Gabrielle Hayes – Health Liaison Librarian

10:00pm

KOS – What is your alignment and how can you change it? – Dominique Hallett, Reference Librarian

10:00pm

read and tweet : a twitter reading group everyone can join – Ellen Forsyth, Consultant, Public Library Services

10:00pm

Social Networking and Teens with Autism Spectrum Disorder – Dr. Corey Marie Hall

10:00pm

The Friday E-Mail List: A Personalized Follow-up to the One-Shot Library Instruction Session – Dale Larsen, Assistant Librarian

10:00pm

The Slow Death of the Reference Collection – Dave Tyckoson, Associate Dean

11:00pm

The  U and You Project: Longitudinal Storytelling Capturing Student’s  Academic Lives – Anthony Sams Digital Scholarship Consultant and Project  Manager Director, Story Center

11:00pm

Virtual Learning Commons: a new image for a school library – Dr. Dana Dukic
Closing Party
Thursday, November 3  

12:00am

Legal Information Requests in the Public Library Setting – Virginia Tucker

12:00am

Using SCVNGR to create an interactive self guided tour – Linda Barron, Directorate Support Officer

1:00am

How to Embed A Librarian, Library Resources and Service Components in Moodle! – Dr. Indira Koneru, Online Course Facilitator

1:00am

Local Collecting for Global Digital Libraries: a Case Study – Amy Brunvand, Digital Scholarship Librarian

1:00am

United Nations University Library: Improving library services for members worldwide – Chad Francisco

3:00am

The introduction reference services in Libraries  with emphasis on reference services 2.0 – Dr. Asefeh Asemi

4:00am

Collaboration;  the Librarian and the Library resources embedded via a VLE. – Monica  Morscheck, Head Librarian and eLearning Coordinator

4:00am

Pottermore and school libraries: multiliteracies at work – Judith Way

5:00am

Dealing with Research Data: the role of Academic Librarians in research support – Ana van Meegen Silva, MA

6:00am

KEYNOTE:  Christine Bruce

7:00am

My Info Quest:  Providing Text Message Reference in Libraries of All Types – Lori Bell, Lecturer

7:00am

Reading 2.0: the new role for librarians – Adam Sofronijevic

7:00am

Technical Skills & Digital Library programs – Elias Tzoc, Digital Initiatives Librarian

8:00am

Clouds  and Trees: Using Folksonomies to transform Online Public Access  Catalogues – Caitlin Bakker, Digital Content Projects Coordinator

8:00am

Ebooks: Do They Use Them? Do They Care – Beth Filar-Williams, Distance Education Librarian

8:00am

Human Target: Staff Is More Important Than Software – Grace Dunbar, Vice President

8:00am

Libraries, Publishers, Vendors – The eBook Whitewater – Robin Nesbitt, Technical Services Director

8:00am

Proactively scanning Twitter & the web for feedback – How are users reacting? – Aaron Tay

9:00am

KEYNOTE: Ellen Tise

9:00am

“Heyyyyy,  Ms. Library Lady: Classroom Management Techniques for Young or  Young-at-Heart Librarians” – Rhonda McCoy, Information Curriculum  Specialist

9:00am

Children’s E-Picture-Books: Can They Help Children Learn to Read? – Lisa Guernsey, Director of the Early Education Initiative

9:00am

Librarians Network Online – Anna Taranenko, Social Media Specialist

9:00am

Presentation  of a gamification project : an online serious game to learn information  skills to 9-12 years old – Thierry Robert, Librarian

9:00am

Ready  to Read Corps: How the Columbus Metropolitan Library is using Every  Child Ready to Read in a bold new way – Sarah Mackey, Manager

9:00am

Using Instructional Architectures to Create Innovative Online Learning Experiences – Sami Lange, MLIS, MS.Ed  Adjunct Librarian

10:00am

Best Practices for Increasing the Use Of Online Databases – Peter Simon, MLS, VP Product management

10:00am

Creating instructional screencasts: An overview of available tools and best practices – Michelle Holschuh Simmons

10:00am

Get ‘Em While They’re Young: The Embedded Elementary School Librarian – Briar Sauro, Librarian, Grades 2-4

10:00am

The Open Education Movement and Libraries – Rebecca Hedreen, Library Coordinator for Distance Learning

10:00am

The Use of Web 2.0/emerging technologies in the LIS field in the Caribbean: an exploration – Beverley Wood

11:00am

Deliver books the Netflix way – shawn strecker

11:00am

Introduction to Digital Game-Based Learning in Libraries – Mary Snyder Broussard, Instructional Services Librarian

11:00am

Job Help Centers – Steve Hipes, Project Manager

11:00am

Personal Librarian Programs Build Connections – Sarah I. Smith, Reference/Instruction Librarian

11:00am

Using  SNA (social network analysis) to understand your library’s social media  presence – Frank Cervone, Vice Chancellor for Information Services and  CIO

12:00pm

GPII: Innovations in Serving Patrons with Disabilities – Jane Berliss-Vincent, A.M.L.S.

12:00pm

Implementing Student ePortfolios – Anne Arriaga, Librarian

12:00pm

Improve Library Instruction with Emotional Intelligence – Dena Kinney, Director of Education Programs & Services

12:00pm

Privacy and the First Amendment , Friends or Foes in Cyberspace? – Sue Aspley, Head of Copyright Advisory Services

12:00pm

The Economic Legitimacy of Public Libraries – John Wenzler

1:00pm

Creating  a Learning Organization: Technology, socialization, learning, and  culture change – Rudy Leon, Technology Outreach and Training Librarian

1:00pm

Influencing Decision Makers to Give Libraries More Funding? – Cheryl Stenstrom, Library Consultant and Instructor

1:00pm

Readers advisory for book clubs as new reference – Dr Beata Anna Cessak Obydzinski

1:00pm

Riding the “Long Tail”: Leveraging a Niche to Build a Network – John Morris Jackson

1:00pm

SPOTLIGHT:   Successful paths for new librarians: best practices, models and  recommendations – Loida Garcia-Febo, Coordinator, New Americans Program

2:00pm

A Bird in the Bush:  Pathfinders as a Tool for Developing Multiliteracies – Reneé Lyons, Instructional Librarian/Author

2:00pm

Knowledge  for the People, By the People: Teaching an Online Library Studies  Course – Jeffrey Knapp, Reference and Instruction Librarian

2:00pm

Outreach through Gaming – Kathy Makens, Head of Adult Services at the South Regional Library

2:00pm

The Embedded Librarian: A Crucial Addition to Online Courses – Professor William Denny, Distance Learning Librarian

2:00pm

Using  Artificial Intelligence and Virtual Agents to Enhance Library  Information Services – Michele McNeal – Web Specialist, Akron-Summit  County Public Library

3:00pm

KEYNOTE:  Stephen Abram

3:00pm

Making and Sharing Book Trailers – Jennifer Shafer, Library Specialist

3:00pm

My collection isn’t boring! : An unexpected role as advocate for a collection. – Elizabeth Psyck  liaison librarian

3:00pm

Really  long-distance learning:  studying for an American MLIS degree while  living in another country – Charlotte Goodwin, Educational Adviser and  LIS student

3:00pm

So I’ve Checked In…Now What?: Libraries and foursquare – Philip Whitford MLISc Candidate

4:00pm

Changed but Still Critical: Brick and Mortar School Libraries in the Digital Age – DOUGLAS JOHNSON

4:00pm

Digivolution: Meeting eReading & App-etite Needs in Uncharted Territory – Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair

4:00pm

Teaching Data Computing Literacy to Future E-Scientists – Minglu Wang, Data Services Librarian

4:00pm

Teaching Storytelling in an online environment – Beth Wrenn-Estes, Full-Time Lecturer

4:00pm

Toddlers, Touch Technology, and Family Learning at the Library – Monica Wong, Head Librarian

4:00pm

Web  2.0 Tools For You – A Cybrarian’s Guide to Free Resources on the Web  and their Practical Application in Libraries and other Work Environments  – Cheryl Peltier-Davis Archives and Digital Librarian

5:00pm

Down with the FAQ! Bring in the Dynamic PKB (Public Knowledge Base)! – Gabe Gossett, Librarian for Extended Education

5:00pm

Get started circulating eReaders! – Megan Wong, Technology Librarian

5:00pm

Google+: A Plus (or Minus) for Libraries? – Steve Watkins, Coordinator of Technology Development

5:00pm

QR Codes in the Classroom – Gwyneth Jones, The Daring Librarian

5:00pm

Student Research Journal: an Open Access Forum for Graduate Student Contributions to the Profession – Maria Otero-Boisvert

5:00pm

The Evolution of Book Reviewing Practice: New Directions in the 21st Century – Kimberly Black, Assistant Professor

6:00pm

High School Book Clubs in a Digital Age – Phil Goerner, Teacher Librarian

6:00pm

Social Media, User Engagement, and Intellectual Freedom on the Web – Barbara Jones, Director

6:00pm

The Texting Librarian – Willyn Webb, Administrator/Adjunct Professor

6:00pm

Transforming  from the podium instructor to roving lecturer in a classroom. – William  Worford Assistant Professor, Gorgas Information Services

6:00pm

Using  Survey Data to Improve Resources & Services for Online Students –  Emily D. O’Connor, Director of Library & Learning Resources

7:00pm

New Library Models for Client Engagement and Participation – Rory McLeod, Director Client Services and Collections

7:00pm

Online Library Degrees: The Pros and Cons – Kristin Anne Carr, Librarian

7:00pm

School  Libraries Matter: They Involve, Engage, Empower, and Connect! – Roxanne  Clement, Teacher Librarian, Technology Coordinator

7:00pm

SPOTLIGHT:  Create your community with 2.0 Learning…at home, in your spare time…and in your jammies! – Connie Williams

7:00pm

The Importance of Library Express Stations in Community & Cultural Centers – kYmberly Keeton

8:00pm

Connect…Collaborate…Grow…with Twitter! – Nikki Robertson

8:00pm

Linear Thinking for the Non-Linear World – R. U. iN 2 iT? – Martin H. F. Gonser

8:00pm

Make It LIT: K-12 Library and Information Technology Program – Mike Eisenberg, Dean Emeritus

8:00pm

Roles SLIS Students Play in Producing Original Research – Antonia Krupicka-Smith Youth Librarian/SLIS graduate student

8:00pm

The  Unmined Potential of Ebooks: Create Passionate Patrons & Promote  your Library – Natalie Teske Rector, Emerging Technologies Librarian

9:00pm

Embed? Definitely and here’s how! Developing a customized definition of enbedded librarianship. – Christina Peterson, Librarian

9:00pm

Engaging  Teens in Information-based Content Creation via Social Media and Radio  Podcasting – Rebecca Renard, Teens of Distinction Program Coordinato

9:00pm

Knowledge Building Centers in Libraries and Learning Commons – Professor David V. Loertscher

9:00pm

Libraries in the Clouds – DOUG JOHNSON

9:00pm

Libraryhack : Setting content free – Margaret Warren, Senior Planning Officer

10:00pm

“Just click here – imparting effective  scholarly habits to digital natives – the why, the what and the how!” – Ms Heather Todd

10:00pm

information Experiences of Teen Content Creators – Mary Ann Harlan, PhD student

10:00pm

Is this “public” library in Mongolia? – Begzsuren, IT Manager

10:00pm

Libraries:  Portals to Your Ancestral Past – Claire V. Brisson-Banks, BS, MLIS, AG |  British Research Consultant & Technology Specialist

10:00pm

Reference Redux: The Changing Role of the Reference Librarian – Jennifer Bartlett, Head of Reference Services

11:00pm

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Filed under Access Issues, Conferences, Our Profession

Where are the kids’ catalogues?

Recently, I’ve been thinking a lot about kids’ catalogues and how children access our collections. While many of us will point out that the primary users of our kids’ catalogues are parents or teachers looking for books and resources for their children and/or classrooms, we cannot forget that there are a number of children who are just starting to read or are beginnimg readers that use our library catalogues and borrow from our collections.

Unlike in the past, our youngest patrons are on computers all of the time and wow, a lot of them know how to use computers better than we do! But, are their information needs and ability to process all of the text on our next generation catalogues or even existing catalogues, sufficient? Are we serving these children? What about parents and teachers?

One of the unique features I have always found in kids’ catalogues is the dependency on visual cues; icons. Rather than text based catalogues, these catalogues always tend to rely on colourful images, library mascots or some other larger text and clean interface that provides intuitive navigation based on the needs of children, rather than adults. Even parents and teachers could navigate effectively. For example, in systems such as SirsiDynix’s Horizon, the Kids Information Portal (KIP) only retrieves items in the J collections; this includes boardbooks, pictures books, J fiction, J films and television shows, etc. KIP (another library example) weeds out adult and ya collections. Rather than having to sort through or limit searches in an attempt to isolate juvenile collections, parents and children are presented with the content targeted and designed to suit their needs.

For new parents, icons represent pre-structured lists created by staff that may include highlighted boardbooks, family movies and children’s music. For kids, our kids’ catalogues focussed on holiday and seasonal lists that are timely and may relate to school projects. In the end, whatever their needs, the results retrieved could always be relied upon to exclude adult and ya materials.
Three years ago, I started looking at kids’ catalogues around North America to get an idea as to what designs were popular and to gather ideas as to what makes a good catalogue for kids. This was in an attempt to discover what types of catalogues (vendors) are being used, their design, how they can be improved and if they ever realized their potential. Today, I decided to examine some of the links I collected three years ago. To my surprise, many of the libraries that had designed innovative catalogues for children no longer support a kids’ catalogue. Instead, many have migrated to next generation catalogues such as Encore, BiblioCommons and AquaBrowser , abandoning the idea of a kids’ catalogue.

However, are these new catalogues sufficient for children and parents in providing them with access to juvenile collections? Can we point to faceted navigation and spell check as a replacement for larger images, more white space and simplified interfaces? What about the targeted retrieval of specific collections? We must acknowledge that as powerful as next generation catalogues are (and may be in the future), we cannot claim they replace the need for a children’s catalogue and that they are successfully filling the need that our kids’ catalogues do or rather, did.

Will the vendors of next generation catalogues start to implement features for children? Will we be provided with alternate interfaces for our youngest patrons?

Before we throw out our kids’ catalogues, we need to understand why we implemented them in the past and, with a growing computer savvy population of children, why we are doing away with them today. Do our new catalogues, which rely heavily on text and therefore serve our most literature users really respond to the needs of children and replace the need for a kids’ catalogue?

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Filed under Access Issues, Discovery tool platforms, The Library Catalogue

Free ALCTS Webinar on RDA: February 17th

Do you still have questions about RDA that you’re hoping someone can answer?  ALCTS is presenting an “RDA Ask-the-experts” webinar that may be just what some of us need to get those questions answered.

If we submit our questions by January 25th, the panelists will do their best to answer the questions during a 75 minute webinar that will take place on February 17th.

Who are the experts?
* Linda Gabel, OCLC
* Erin Stalberg, North Carolina State University
* Trina Grover, Ryerson University, Toronto
* Kathryn La Barre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
GSLIS

You can find out more information on the registration site and submit your questions by taking this survey.

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Filed under Access Issues, future of cataloguing

The Hole in our Cards: Celebrating the birthday of a professional

Ever wonder who came up with the idea of putting holes in our cards in the card catalogue? I didn’t know who was responsible for this idea until I saw Larry Nix’s blog post on Otis Hall Robinson. December 3rd marked the 175th anniversary of the birth of Otis Hall Robinson who served as Librarian of the University of Rochester Library from 1868 to 1889.

What’s interesting, and Nix points this out as well: How often has a single idea or practice been adopted by every library in America?

Read more about Robinson here.

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Want to comment on RDA?

Now’s your chance.

For all of my US colleagues, whether or not you participated in the RDA testing or creating of records, you’re being invited to comment on RDA. Please, take the time to share your thoughts!

Here’s the announcement:

The U.S. RDA Test Coordinating Committee would welcome comments from individuals or libraries in the U.S. who are not formal or informal Test participants, whether they did or did not create RDA records.

The Committee has designed an online questionnaire. Note that the questionnaire is designed primarily to accept comments about the experiences of creating catalog records using the RDA instructions and of using RDA records in a catalog but record creation is not a requirement for filling out the survey.

If you are a formal US RDA Test participant and have submitted other surveys for the Test, please do not use the Informal US RDA Testers Questionnaire.

If your comments relate to the RDA Toolkit, please also email them to Troy Linker, ALA Publishing (tlinker@ala.org).

If your comments relate to the content of RDA, please also email them to John Attig, ALA representative to the Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA (jxa16@psu.edu).

And, if your comments relate to the RDA Vocabularies, please email them to Diane Hillmann, co-chair, DCMI/RDA Task Group (metadata.maven@gmail.com)

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Filed under Access Issues, future of cataloguing

Free RDA Webinars in November

For those of you who haven’t seen this announcement:

RDA Toolkit— What’s new since August
Join Publisher Troy Linker and the RDA Toolkit staff for a free webinar showcasing some of the new functionality and content added to the RDA Toolkit since the end of the open-access period (August 31).

The webinar will include
• LCPS (Library of Congress Policy Statements)-now included in the RDA toolkit. See a demo, including interactivity with RDA
• Accessing and using globally and locally shared workflows
• Creating and sharing your own workflows
• Links from AACR2 to RDA
• Using RDA Toolkit support , including new how-to videos
• Discussion of future enhancements
• Q&A

EVENT DETAILS:
(Offered at multiple times to allow people in different time zones to participate; the times listed are US Central time zone hours. The World Clock (http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/) will help you work out the best time for you.)

Dates
Wednesday, November 10, 11:30am-12:30pm CDT (GMT -6) [New Time Added]
Wednesday, November 10, 8:00-9:00pm CDT (GMT -6) [Good choice for Australia and Asia]
Thursday, November 11, 9:00-10:00am CDT (GMT -6) [Good choice for Europe and Africa]
Thursday, November 11, 3:00-4:00pm CDT (GMT -6)

Visit URL below to reserve your place today at one of these upcoming virtual sessions!
https://alapublishing.webex.com/alapublishing/onstage/g.php?p=2&t=m

For those not able to attend one of the live events, they will be recorded and posted to http://www.rdatoolkit.org/training.

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Filed under Access Issues, future of cataloguing, The Library Catalogue